12th century tunic for my husband – how I made the counterpart for the 12th century neckline fastening and some other details…

2015-12-Racaire-Conrads-12th-century-tunic-grey-light-wool-tunicTodays posting about “how I made the counterpart for the 12th century neckline fastening and some other details…” brings us finally to the last progress pictures of the 12th century grey light-wool tunic project for my husband.

Though I already showed you my period inspiration for this quite special 12th century neckline shape and how my take on this special neckline form based on the 12th century neckline inspiration looks like, it seems like I neglected a quite important detail till now: the period inspired fastening and its counterpart…

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Reinforcement of neckline stress points – an old hand sewing technique revived

Racaire Meridian Grand TournamentIn my last posting I showed you how I strengthened and secured the stress points of the neckline of my husbands new grey tunic. But before anyone starts to call this “Racaire’s neckline reinforcement technique”, I would like to point out that I simply found and revived an old hand sewing technique. I did not invent this technique myself – I simply found it in a very old book I own. 🙂

Well, I admit it, whenever I face a sewing or embroidery related problem, I tend to turn to my quite extensive book collection and take a look through my beloved books. In many cases one of my books offers a very good solution for my problem.

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12th century tunic for my husband – how to secure & strengthen the stress points of a 12th century neckline

My husbands christmas gift - a grey light-wool 12th century tunic – neckline stress pointsIn my last posting  “12th century tunic for my husband – spotting the stress points of a 12th century neckline” I showed you how to find and identify the most vulnerable points of your neckline – or “stress points”, how I tend to call them.

Most of the basic 12th century neckline styles – like a simple round or keyhole neckline – don’t really require any extra strengthening. Due to their lack of real stress points (round neckline) or because their only stress points get exposed to a little bit of extra tension from time to time (keyhole neckline), it is not really necessary to take extra action…

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12th century tunic for my husband – spotting the stress points of a 12th century neckline

2015-12 - Racaire - 12th century tunic grey light wool tunic - 12th century neckline - stress points - blue dalmatica inspiredIn my most recent postings I showed you my period inspiration for my husbands 12th century neckline as well as how the finished neckline looks like. And today I will tell you how to spot the stress points of your own neckline before I show you how to strengthen and secure them in my next posting.

In order to prevent problems like ripping fabric at the stress points of your neckline, I need to give you some more information about how to find the stress points of your 12th century neckline first so you can determine and strengthen them:

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12th century tunic for my husband – the finished 12th century neckline

My husbands christmas gift - a grey light-wool 12th century tunic – 12th century necklineIn my last posting – “12th century tunic for my husband – 12th century neckline inspired by the “blue Dalmatika” & “white Alba” – I showed you my period inspiration for the 12th century neckline for my husbands new tunic. And today I am going to show you the finished 12th century neckline.

Well, it took a while and quite some thinking but eventually I figured the cut out and made a good fitting 12th century neckline. This part of the 12th century tunic project was definitely not easy as I also wanted to incorporate a tablet woven band I made myself. Unfortunately tablet woven bands only stretch little and make it therefore not easy to be applied along round edges…
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12th century tunic for my husband – 12th century neckline inspired by the “blue Dalmatika” & “white Alba”

2015-12 - Racaire - Conrads 12th century tunic grey light-wool tunicAnd today let’s take a further look at the 12th century tunic I made for my husband last winter and especially its 12th century neckline inspired by the “blue Dalmatika” and the “white Alba”.

I already started to post about this 12th century tunic project several weeks ago but somehow I got a little bit sidetracked after the last posting. It seems like my brain acts like a squirrel at times as I can get easily distracted. Sometimes it can be a hard task for me to keep track of all my projects as there are so many – future, current and already finished ones…

However, postponed is definitely not abandoned. I am picking up the thread right were I dropped it with a posting about my inspiration for the 12th century neckline for my husbands tunic. 🙂
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12th century tunic pattern for my husband

My husbands christmas gift - based on a 12th century tunic pattern - a grey light-wool 12th century tunic – sleevesAfter several days of drawing and re-drawing, I am finally able to present to you a new addition to my pattern collection – the (late) 12th century tunic pattern which I have been using so successfully for my husbands tunic projects till now:

Well, I admit it, my 12th century tunic pattern is actually based on a tunic found in a royal grave from the early 13th century. Though it can’t be said for sure, my personal opinion is that this pattern can also be counted towards the late 12th century. Due to my love for the 12th century, I decided to count this tunic pattern towards to the late 12th century rather than the early 13th century.
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My husbands christmas gift – a grey light-wool 12th century tunic – how to imitate a woven band for bottom embellishment… :)

2015-12-Racaire-Conrads-12th-century-tunic-grey-light-wool-tunic_how to imitate a woven bandYes, you read it right, todays posting is about “how to imitate a woven band for bottom embellishment” (of a tunic). 🙂

I guess that many of you never expected that I would say this one time, but sometimes special projects will come along for which a very simple embroidered embellishment can actually be the best choice. Especially when you decide to decorate a garment without taking the focus off of the main “star” – which in this case happens to be the tablet woven band I used for the neckline and the cuffs.

But before we take a closer look at my take on “how to imitate a woven band” with embroidery, I would like to share a thought about the connection of imitation and embroidery with you…

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My husbands christmas gift – a grey light-wool 12th century tunic – a rolled hem for the bottom… :)

My husbands christmas gift - a grey light-wool 12th century tunic – rolled hemAfter adding the tablet woven band to the cuffs of my husbands new grey light-wool 12th century tunic, I took on  the bottom hem of the tunic and finished it by using the rather simple “rolled hem” technique.

Ok, I admit it – just using the rolled hem technique for the bottom hem seemed a little bit too simple and easy. Therefore I added a little bit of a twist to my rolled hem – literally… *lol*
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My husbands christmas gift – a grey light-wool 12th century tunic – tablet woven band & cuffs

2015-12 - Racaire - Conrads - 12th century tunic - grey light wool tunic with tablet woven band decoration for the cuffsCuffs, Cuffs, Cuffs and tablet woven band… 😀

Let’s talk about the cuffs for my husbands christmas present today – a 12th century tunic made from lovely grey light weight wool.

Though I didn’t embroider the cuffs for my sweethearts 12th century tunic, they are still quite special for me as I decorated them with some tablet woven band I made myself – or well, I made about half of it to be precise… *lol*

And it is actually the second tablet woven band I ever made. You might even remember the band – I posted about it in May of 2014: “My new tablet weaving loom & my 2nd try of weaving with tablets 🙂

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